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Can Suboxone Get You High?

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Opioid addiction is running rampant across most of the United States. People experiencing massive amounts of pain after an accident, injury or surgery are prescribed pain killers to help treat the pain.

When the dosage they were prescribed no longer squelches the pain that they feel, some people tend to take the medication more frequently or in larger doses to help treat the pain. Taking prescription pain killers can be a slippery slope because you don’t have to take them for too long to become addicted to them.

Nearly 2.5 million people in America are currently battling an addiction to opioids. Being able to get clean from them can be difficult to do on your own, especially if you are still in a lot of pain.

Fortunately, there are options when it comes to getting clean from your addiction though. Walk through the ins and outs of drug addiction treatment and how it can be beneficial to you.

Detoxing from Opioids Can be Difficult

Many people feel ashamed of their addiction and attempt to overcome it on their own only to fail. This is due to the extreme withdrawal symptoms that they experience. When you stop using opioids, your body craves them for quite a few days. During the first few days, you will detox from the drugs.

This means that the number of drugs you have in your body will slowly decrease over time. As this happens, your body starts to react in unpleasant ways.

During the detox period, many people have muscle cramping, nausea, dizziness and even vomiting. It can be hard to function because your entire body can feel as though it is revolting against you.

At the same time that your body is going through the symptoms, you may start to feel emotional symptoms of withdrawal too, such as paranoia, depression, anxiety, and even anger.

You Don’t Have to Fight Your Addiction Alone

There are many great treatment facilities available that you can go to when you are ready to quit using drugs. You can take suboxone while you are in the treatment facility to help you with the withdrawal symptoms that you experience.

Suboxone is created with two main ingredients, buprenorphine, and naloxone. The combination of these substances creates a drug that helps to minimize the overall withdrawal symptoms that you have to incur as you detox.

Suboxone Should be Taken in a Controlled Environment at First

It’s important to know that when you first stop using drugs, you will still have an emotional attachment to them. Many people assume that the only reason they take drugs is that they are physically addicted to them, but that isn’t always the case. There are many times when the tie to drugs is emotional, as well.

Suboxone can help reduce your cravings for opioids for the most part, but it cannot stop you from wanting them psychologically. You need to go to drug treatment counseling in order to determine if you have a psychological or emotional addiction to the drugs as well.

Many people battling opioid addiction have a co-occurring disorder and need to be treated for their mental or emotional disorder, as well as their addiction.

When you first quit using drugs, taking suboxone on your own may not be the best option to consider. You will still be surrounded by all of the temptations that you had before and there is a good chance that you could still be around drug abusers that you hung out with when you were getting high.

There are many drug addicts who steal suboxone because it can create a euphoric state if it is taken in excess.

How will suboxone get you high? Suboxone is designed to block pain receptors to make getting clean from drugs easier. The euphoric feeling that it creates when you are taking it in a controlled setting, as prescribed is so minimal that most addicts don’t even recognize it as being high.

On the streets, addicts know that taking suboxone outside of its intended use can get them a similar feeling to the high that they get on opioids, but it will last much longer than it does when they take other drugs.

The high that suboxone causes isn’t as intense as the high opioids cause, but due to the long duration of the high that it causes, it is still very sought after by addicts across the United States.

Avoiding a Suboxone High Isn’t Difficult

If you really want to get clean from drugs, you shouldn’t try to get high from suboxone. Taking the medication in a controlled setting prevents you from being able to abuse it and allows you to learn how to take medications properly so that you don’t abuse other drugs again in the future.

While you are within the facility, you’ll be taught important things that you need to know about drugs and addiction.

There are many addicts who don’t realize that they are susceptible to become addicted to other drugs again in the future. The education that you receive from the drug treatment facility arms you with the necessary tools you need to be able to avoid addiction in the future and to seek help right away if you feel that there is a chance that you may be relapsing.

Nearly half of all addicts who try to quit do end up relapsing again at some point or another. Avoiding a relapse requires hard work and dedication on your part.

After your initial treatment in a drug treatment facility, you may be able to seek outpatient care. This could mean that you could be prescribed suboxone to take at home. You need to be sure that you always take it as prescribed and that you store it properly.

You need to be sure that no one can get their hands on the prescription without your knowledge and that it isn’t within reach of pets or small children.

 

Sources

[1] American Society of Addiction Medicine. (2016). Opioid Addiction. Retrieved from https://www.asam.org/docs/default-source/advocacy/opioid-addiction-disease-facts-figures.pdf

[2] National Institute on Drug Abuse. (n.d.). How effective are medications to treat opioid use disorder? Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/medications-to-treat-opioid-addiction/efficacy-medications-opioid-use-disorder

[3] Science Direct. (2017). Partial Agonist. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/nursing-and-health-professions/partial-agonist

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